Photos, Artwork, & Musings on Life, Spirit, Entheogens, and What Is Real

Posts tagged “Colorado

Autumn Fire – Golden Aspens in Colorado

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“He found himself wondering at times, especially in the autumn, about the wild lands, and strange visions of mountains that he had never seen came into his dreams.”

― J.R.R. Tolkien, The Fellowship of the Ring

 

Autumn is my favorite time of year in Texas because it lasts longer than spring and the temperatures are such a relief after our hot summers, but there is little leaf color until early December, and then only a hint of the kind of color one sees in the northeast or in the mountains of the great American West. I love to make a special trip to see the aspens change in Colorado. Here is one of my photos for you – just an autumn greeting and a wish-you-well for the upcoming Thanksgiving and other holiday times.

I took this one just outside Silverton, Colorado a couple of years ago.

 

What does autumn go on paying for
with so much yellow money?”

― Pablo Neruda

 

 

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A New Vista

 

 

 

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In a New Land

 

Long I have struggled in the valley, only

To look up at the end and realize with a

Sudden start,

That I have arrived at the top of a

Mountain, instead.

 

The view ahead is one of beauty

And favor. The path before me is

Enticing, promising.

More hills in view, but

The slope is gentle

And green.

 

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I’m anticipating a very big change in my life, which I will describe at the right time, but this poem came to me today to speak of the way change can sometimes come unexpectedly upon us, just when it seems that all things are stuck in an old pattern and won’t ever change. Maybe that valley we’ve been struggling through is not a valley after all. Maybe we will suddenly gasp as we gaze into a new vista. Then, we must not fear. We must take action and step confidently into our new world, creating it as we go.

 

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Autumn Color in the San Juan Mtns. – Colorado

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Autumn is a second spring when every leaf is a flower.
-Albert Camus

Late September is always a special time in one of my favorite places to visit: Silverton, Colorado. The mountains have yet to acquire their winter white and the aspens shimmer and dazzle the eye.

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The famous Silverton – Durango narrow gauge steam train pulls in to the old western town, just like it has done since the 1800′s. I never tire of watching it come and go and hearing that incredible whistle and the rumble of the locomotive.

 

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Shall I not have intelligence with the earth? Am I not partly leaves and vegetable mould myself?
- Henry David Thoreau, Solitude, Walden, 1854

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Update: Chimney Rock now a National Monument!

POSTING PAUSE OVER:
FIRST, I’d like to say that I’ll be posting again now that I’m back from a 2 1/2 week trip to the Colorado Plateau. I’ll have many new photos and thoughts to share soon. Thanks to those who have commented or contacted me.

CHIMNEY ROCK:

As many of you have heard, Chimney Rock Archeological Site has just been granted National Monument status today by President Obama. This is a welcome event, and something I supported in my recent post on the subject here.

Update: Just learned that the fire tower that was so out of place and obstructing the view of the chimneys has been removed already!! That is great news and makes today’s National Monument status all the better! The representative from the Chimney Rock Interpretive Association said: “the fire tower has been removed and that has dramatically opened the view of the twin spires.”


Chimney Rock – Ancestral Puebloan Site

I enjoy visiting and appreciating the archeological sites of the Ancestral Puebloan people of the desert southwest of the United States. I’m still adjusting to this new terminology, now arguably preferred by most Puebloans and archeologists over the more well-known term, “Anasazi,” which is derived from the Navajo word for “enemy.” (One writer, though, has pointed out that the term “pueblo” is from the Spanish conquistadors, who were much more of an enemy to the Puebloans.)

This particular site is in southern Colorado and I had passed it by on many trips to and from the mountains until I decided to make the effort to see it in 2008. I was surprised at the size and beauty of the buildings, here in one of the most northern Puebloan sites, nestled in the foothills of the Rocky Mountains. It was cold in the winter, but they built here because of the striking rock formation we call “Chimney Rock.” The Ancestral Puebloans used this feature as a lunar observatory. They built a large ceremonial Great House and Great Kiva, reminiscent of the ones in Chaco Canyon, off to the southwest in New Mexico. There are approximately 200 rooms in the complex which was built about 1,000  to 1,100 CE.

The lunar connection is important, as the moon goes through a positional cycle that lasts about 18.6 years. At the end of the cycle, the moon appears to pause for a while before “reversing course.” From the ridge where the Great House was built, that lunar standstill causes the moon to appear directly between the two “chimneys” of rock that protrude. The last time this occurred was in 2004-2008. The next Major Lunar Standstill will occur about 2022.
More information and some interesting photos of the event here.

This is a nice site to visit. There is a bit of a walk to see the Great House and kivas. Unfortunately, there is a distracting and out of place fire observatory on the site between the Great House and the chimneys. When I was there, they were talking about the possibility of it being removed at some point as it also blocks the lunar standstill view. I hope they do.

There is also a move underway to have Chimney Rock site designated as a National Monument to protect it into the future. I support this effort.

I also have some photos of Chaco Canyon and other sites that I will share as I can.

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Stone Echoes

Pyrography on natural gourd by David Crews. This is “Cliff Palace” in Mesa Verde NP

The old ones had their own names for the homes they made under the shadow of the cliffs.
Sometimes, their voices yet echo softly down the walls of stone. You may hear them if you are very still.

Alcove House Kiva - Bandelier Nat. Mon.

It was a good life, here in the protected canyon with its stream and its cottonwood trees. There was trade and there were crops of corn. The women wove the magic into the fabric of their clothing and baskets, and the men kept the farms and hunted on the mesas.

They gathered in sacred spaces to experience those things that connected them to the spirits of the land.

This ceased to be one day, as the people walked away from their elegant labors. We still do not know for certain just why.

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